SALVADOR DALI

Salvador Dali (1904-1989) Spanish painter. He was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde imaginative painter. He studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid. Dali was a prolific writer, filmmaker, sculpture, photographer, and cultivated an eccentric public personality with his mustache.

In the 1920s, Dali went to Paris and began interacting with artists such as Picasso, Magritte and Miró, which led to Dali’s first Surrealist phase. Dali is perhaps best known for his 1931 painting The Persistence of Memory, showing melting clocks in a landscape setting.

During World War II, Salvador Dali and his wife moved to the United States and remained there until 1948. These were important years for Dali. Salvador Dali had his own retrospective exhibit in 1941 at Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art in New York. 

Important year 1974

In 1974 The Teatro-Museo Dali officially opened. The new building was formed from the ruins of the old, and based on one of Dali’s designs, and is billed as the world’s largest Surrealist structure. Several works on permanent display were created for the museum.

Also the same year, Salvador Dali dissolved his business relationship with manager Peter Moore. As a result, all rights to his collection were sold without his permission by other business managers, and he lost much of his wealth.

Therefore, collector A. Reynolds Morse and his wife, Eleanor, who had known Dalí since 1942, set up an organization called “Friends of Dali” and a foundation to help boost the artist’s finances. After that Salvador Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida was established by the organization.

In conclusion, Salvador Dali is considered one of the greatest artists of all time.

The Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation currently serves as his official estate.

He said “Every morning when I wake up, I experience an exquisite joy —the joy of being Salvador Dali— and I ask myself in rapture: What wonderful things is this Salvador Dali going to accomplish today?”